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Nigel Honeybone

"Rondo Award Winner Nigel Honeybone's debut was as Hamlet's dead father, portraying him as a tall posh skeleton. This triumph was followed in Richard III, as the remains of a young prince which he interpreted as a tall posh skeleton. He began attracting starring roles. Henry VIII was scaled down to suit Honeybone's very personalised view of this famous king. Honeybone suggested that perhaps he really was quite skeletal, quite tall, and quite posh. MacBeth, Shylock and Othello followed, all played as tall, skeletal and posh, respectively. Considering his reputation for playing tall English skeletons, many believed that the real Honeybone inside to be something very different, like a squat hunchback perhaps. Interestingly enough, Honeybone did once play a squat hunchback, but it was as a tall posh skeleton. But he was propelled into the film world when, in Psycho (1960), he wore women's clothing for the very first time. The seed of an idea was planted and, after working with director Ed Wood for five years, he realised the unlimited possibilities of tall posh skeletons who dressed in women's clothing. He went on to wear women's clothing in thirteen major motion pictures, including the Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) and Star Wars (1977), heartbreaking as the remains of Aunt Beru. With the onslaught of special effects came the demise of real actors in these sorts of roles. After modeling for CGI skeletons in Total Recall (1990) and Toys (1992), the only possible step forward for a tall posh skeleton was television, imparting his knowledge and expertise of the arts. As well as writing for the world's best genre news website HORROR NEWS, Nigel Honeybone also presents the finest examples of B-grade horror on THE SCHLOCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW seen every Friday night on TVS Television Sydney." (Fantales candy wrapper)

To See The Invisible Man

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Scientific knowledge was never one of the requirements needed for a successful Hollywood scriptwriter. At least science fiction authors are usually aware of scientific flaws and try to disguise them with pseudo-science. For instance, they’ve long got around Einstein’s law regarding the impossibility of faster-than-light travel by taking a short-cut through ‘hyper-space’. My old friend H.G. Wells was well aware ...

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Film Review: Horrors Of Spider Island (1960)

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SYNOPSIS: “En route to a show in Singapore, a troupe of beautiful dancers are stranded on a deserted island by a plane crash. Their routine of skinny-dipping and devising new skimpy outfits is interrupted when a radioactive spider bites their manager and turns him into a wild-eyed, furry-faced monster with three fangs and a passion for strangling.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: ...

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Film Review: Heavenly Creatures (1994)

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SYNOPSIS: “Based on the true story of Juliet Hulme and Pauline Parker, two close friends who share a love of fantasy and literature, who conspire to kill Pauline’s mother when she tries to end the girls’ intense and obsessive relationship.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: From the time of Oedipus Rex by Sophocles to the more recent Menendez brothers and O.J. Simpson, ...

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How To ‘Make’ A Monster

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How does one identify a monster? The question is easier to answer by example than definition. In movie terms, a monster is something unnatural, dangerous and out of control. King Kong (1933), the Frankenstein (1931) monster, Godzilla (1954), Dracula (1931), Ray Harryhausen’s cyclops from The Seventh Voyage Of Sinbad (1958), the Alien (1979), The Mummy (1932). That’s the monster A-list, ...

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A Brief History Of Hammer

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One of the most successful and prolific British production companies, Hammer Films has become synonymous with horror – most notably the unforgettable series of Dracula and Frankenstein films which were instrumental in launching the careers of my dear old friends Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. Elevating the horror film in much the same fashion as the illustrious Ealing Studios did ...

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Film Review: The Golem (1920)

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SYNOPSIS: “In 16th-century Prague, a Jewish rabbi creates a giant creature from clay, called the Golem, and using sorcery, brings the creature to life in order to protect the Jews of Prague from persecution.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: The Gothic tradition had always been stronger in Germany than anywhere else, ever since the Romantic Movement at the beginning of the Nineteenth ...

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Film Review: Ghost Story (1981)

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SYNOPSIS: “Four successful elderly gentlemen, members of the Chowder Society, share a gruesome fifty-year-old secret. When one of Edward Wanderley’s twin sons dies in a bizarre accident, the group begins to see a pattern of frightening events developing.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: Ghost Story (1981) is another film about a cohesive social group (not religious zealots this time, but four upper-class ...

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Film Review: The Fury (1978)

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SYNOPSIS: “A secret US agency behind the unscrupulous Childres gathers children with parapsychological abilities and trains them to become killers in war situations. To rescue his son, who was officially declared dead after an arranged accident, the ex-CIA agent Peter investigates against Childres.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: If Dressed To Kill (1980) is Brian DePalma‘s Psycho (1960), and Obsession (1976) his ...

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Film Review: Frankenstein Versus The Creature From Blood Cove (2005)

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SYNOPSIS: “Near an isolated beach on California’s coast, a sinister plan is underway in a laboratory of horror. Three renegade scientists have resurrected the Frankenstein Monster and they have also created a genetically engineered half-man half fish abomination, to use as secret weapons in the fight against terrorists worldwide. However, disaster strikes when the terrifying monsters chemical brainwashing fails and ...

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Book Review: Flowers In The Attic – Author Virginia Andrews

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Although she passed away in December 1986, Virginia Andrews‘ name lives on as one of the world’s biggest selling novelists, with over seventy million copies of her books and stories in print. Often described inaccurately as horror novels, her tales reveal the dark side of human nature, mixing Dickensian motivations with Gothic melodrama to create a hybrid fiction that has ...

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Film Review: The Evil Mind (1934)

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SYNOPSIS: “Maximus, a small-time music hall mind reader, has frightening flashes of precognition; but he cannot predict or control them – until he realizes he has them in the presence of Christine, attractive daughter of a publisher, who makes Rene, his equally lovely wife, wretchedly jealous. But worse trouble comes to Maximus when he’s accused of causing a disaster he ...

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Film Review: The Double-D Avenger (2001)

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SYNOPSIS: “Three of the biggest and bustiest Russ Meyer stars make a comeback in The Double-D Avenger, the first in a series of sexy action-comedy feature films by William Winckler Productions. Big, busty Chastity Knott must use her new amazing abilities as the super-stacked costumed crime fighter to stop villainous bikini bar owner Al Purplewood and his sexy, murderous strippers.” ...

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Dino De Laurentiis

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Dino De Laurentiis is something of an enigmatic figure in film-making. Generally dismissed as a philistine, insolently nicknamed Dino De Dum-Dum by a British cinema magazine, he has nevertheless been described by director David Cronenberg (who is nobody’s ‘yes-man’) as “A very interesting man, one of the last of the old-style moguls. It’s pretty exhilarating working with him, because he ...

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Film Review: The Devil’s Rain (1975)

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SYNOPSIS: “A bunch of Satanists in the American rural landscape have terrible powers which enable them to melt their victims. However one of the children of an earlier victim vows to destroy them.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: Mark Preston (William Shatner) and his parents live in the desert and one rainy night some unexpected company stops by. Jonathan Corbis (Ernest Borgnine), ...

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