Author Archives: Nigel Honeybone

Film Review: Moontrap (1989)

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SYNOPSIS: “During a routine flight, two veteran space shuttle pilots discover an alien artifact and bring it back to earth. It soon turns out to be an extraterrestrial war robot, which is able to recycle any biological or technical material for its own deadly use. The two astronauts are sent to the moon where NASA expects to uncover the mystery of the alien robot’s origin. They discover an ancient humanoid culture and battle the ultimate … Continue reading

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Film Review: Bluebeard (1944)

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SYNOPSIS: “A killer of young women, dubbed Bluebeard, is loose in Paris. Lucille and her friends meet Gaston Morrell, a puppeteer. He invites them to a show the next night – they go. Afterwards, he walks with Lucille, she offers to make costumes for his next show, he accepts, and feelings develop that may lead to love. She suspects he has a tragic past. Meanwhile, his leaving the show with Lucille prompts the jealousy of … Continue reading

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Film Review: The Werewolf Versus Vampire Woman (1970)

Werewolf vs The Vampire Woman poster 1

SYNOPSIS: “Elvira is traveling through the French countryside with her friend Genevieve, searching for the lost tomb of a medieval murderess and possible vampire, Countess Wandessa. They find a likely site in the castle of Waldemar Daninsky, who invites the women to stay as long as they like. As Waldemar shows Elvira the tomb that supposedly houses the countess, she accidentally causes the vampire to come back to life, hungrier than ever. Daninsky has a … Continue reading

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Film Review: Dead And Buried (1981)

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SYNOPSIS: “Potters Bluff, Rhode Island. may seem to be a sleepy little town. At least for the casual visitor and the local sheriff, Daniel Gillis. However, all of a sudden, there are a lot of strange murders where strangers or people passing through are killed by mobs of townspeople. Only Sheriff Gillis has no clue to what’s going on. Fortunately, the town has an excellent undertaker, William G. Dobbs, who is happy to take care … Continue reading

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Film Review: The Wild Women Of Wongo (1958)

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SYNOPSIS: “On the tropical island of Wongo, a tribe of beautiful women discover that the other side of the island is inhabited by a tribe of handsome men. They also discover that a tribe of evil ape men live on the island, too, and the ape men are planning a raid on the tribe in order to capture mates.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: Hello, good evening and welcome. I’m your host, Nigel Honeybone, loosed from Hell … Continue reading

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Film Review: Horror Express (1972)

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SYNOPSIS: “In 1906, in China, Professor Alexander Saxton discovers an ancient frozen fossil in the remote Province of Szechuan. He brings the remains of the being in a box to Shanghai and boards a trans-Siberian train, where he meets his acquaintance Doctor Wells. During the trip, a life force trapped in the frozen creature is released, killing and stealing the memories of the passengers.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: Can you imagine what you’d get if you … Continue reading

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Film Review: The Terror (1963)

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SYNOPSIS: “France in the Eighteenth Century. Lieutenant Andre Duvalier has been accidentally separated from his regiment. He is wandering near the coast when he sees a young woman and asks her for directions to Coldon, where he hopes to rejoin his regiment. But the woman doesn’t answer, doesn’t even greet him and walks away. Eventually she takes him towards the sea, where she disappears in rough water. Andre loses consciousness while trying to follow her, … Continue reading

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Film Review: Taxi Driver (1976)

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SYNOPSIS: “Travis Bickle is an ex-Marine and Vietnam War veteran living in New York City. As he suffers from insomnia, he spends his time working as a cabbie at night, watching p*rn movies at seedy cinemas during the day, or thinking about how the world, New York in particular, has deteriorated into a cesspool. He’s a loner who has strong opinions about what is right and wrong with mankind. For Travis, the one bright spot … Continue reading

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Film Review: Svengali (1931)

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SYNOPSIS: “Svengali is a singing teacher, pianist and general music impresario living in Paris. He has special talents as he is able to mesmerize others through his music and through his strong hypnotic powers. He uses these talents specifically to seduce his female students for his own evil monetary gains. He discards them just as easily when they are no longer of use to him. After he hears her sing (despite she not being a … Continue reading

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Key Genre Films 1930s

1930s

In 1924 the first major theatrical production of Bram Stoker’s Dracula opened on stage in England. Starring writer-actor Hamilton Deane, the play was such a success that it was transferred to London’s West End. In 1927 the production opened on Broadway starring a young Hungarian actor named Bela Lugosi. Universal pictures purchased the screen rights that same year for US$40,000, intending to make the first ‘talkie’ version of the film with their resident horror kings, … Continue reading

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Key Genre Films 1920s

1920s

The coming of sound to the movies meant a great deal to the development of the fantasy genre. Although science fiction and particularly horror films had been produced since the earliest days of the medium, the addition of dialogue and, more importantly, special effects, greatly enhanced the creative abilities of filmmakers. As early as the turn of last century, Frenchman Georges MĂ©liès had making short ‘trick’ films which had often been about or featured fantastic … Continue reading

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Luis Buñuel

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While the commercial form of genre cinema was being shaped, first in Germany in the twenties and then Hollywood in the thirties, it was receiving a rather different kind of input from several non-commercial intellectual filmmakers in Europe. Yet it was not so very long before the influence of the artistic movement of surrealism was making its way into the commercial cinema as well. Surrealism as a separately definable movement grew up around 1924, evolving … Continue reading

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The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy (TV series)

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“There is a theory which states that if anybody discovers exactly what the universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There is another theory which states that this has already happened.” So go the metaphysical musings of the late British humourist and author Douglas Adams in his best-selling cult novel The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy, a pre-Red Dwarf mix … Continue reading

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Film Review: Toomorrow (1970)

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SYNOPSIS: “A group of students pay their way through school by forming a pop band called Toomorrow. Sonic vibrations from a special instrument called a ‘tonaliser’ cause an extraterrestrial to abduct the group, and have them entertain the Alphoid population.” (courtesy Wikipedia) REVIEW: In the early seventies, diversification within genre films continued after the breakthrough year of 1968. For instance, the year 1970 saw the first science fiction musical since Just Imagine (1930), though not … Continue reading

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Film Review: This Island Earth (1955)

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SYNOPSIS: “Doctor Meacham is chosen along with others by the inhabitants of the planet Metaluna to do research that will help save their dying planet. However, an evil scheme is uncovered by the suspecting Meacham when he discovers the Metalunan’s plan to take over Earth. Meacham then escapes an exploding Metalunan-built Earth lab along with Doctor Adams only to be kidnapped while flying away in a small plane. A flying saucer whisks both the scientists … Continue reading

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Film Review: Don’t Look Now (1973)

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SYNOPSIS: “John and Laura Baxter are living in Venice when they meet a pair of elderly sisters, one of whom claims to be psychic. She insists that she sees the spirit of the Baxters’ daughter, who recently drowned. Laura is intrigued, but John resists the idea. He, however, seems to have his own psychic flashes, seeing their daughter walk the streets in her red cloak, as well as Laura and the sisters on a funeral … Continue reading

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About Nigel Honeybone

Wee Willie"Nigel Honeybone's debut was as Hamlet's dead father, portraying him as a tall posh skeleton. This triumph was followed in Richard III, as the remains of a young prince which he interpreted as a tall posh skeleton. He began attracting starring roles. Henry VIII was scaled down to suit Honeybone's very personalised view of this famous king. Honeybone suggested that perhaps he really was quite skeletal, quite tall, and quite posh. MacBeth, Shylock and Othello followed, all played as tall, skeletal and posh, respectively. Considering his reputation for playing tall English skeletons, many believed that the real Honeybone inside to be something very different, like a squat hunchback perhaps. Interestingly enough, Honeybone did once play a squat hunchback, but it was as a tall posh skeleton. But he was propelled into the film world when, in Psycho (1960), he wore women's clothing for the very first time. The seed of an idea was planted and, after working with director Ed Wood for five years, he realised the unlimited possibilities of tall posh skeletons who dressed in women's clothing. He went on to wear women's clothing in thirteen major motion pictures, including the Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) and Star Wars (1977), heartbreaking as the remains of Aunt Beru. With the onslaught of special effects came the demise of real actors in these sorts of roles. After modeling for CGI skeletons in Total Recall (1990) and Toys (1992), the only possible step forward for a tall posh skeleton was television, imparting his knowledge and expertise of the arts. As well as writing for the world's best genre news website HORROR NEWS, Nigel Honeybone is currently signed to star in a new series for television presenting the finest examples of B-grade horror. THE SCHLOCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW is seen on Friday nights at 10.30pm on TVS Television Sydney, and where ever good Youtube downloads are available." (Fantales candy wrapper circa 2007)