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Home | Anthony Caro

Anthony Caro

A professional freelancer and ghostwriter for 15 years, Anthony Caro published articles and essays in Cult Movies, Mad Scientist, Rue Morgue, Scary Monsters, and more. As a former indie radio producer in Philadelphia, he lent his talents to the independent film world, too. Some time ago, he worked in development for Fortress Features, the company behind The Collector films. Caro recently completed a commissioned neo-noir screenplay and will release an upcoming book on classic horror films in the coming months. And you can call him Tony.

The Howling Over A Monstrously Inappropriate Gift

The Howling (1981) deserves its cult status as, arguably, one of the best werewolf films ever made. Screenwriter John Sayles (Alligator, Lone Star) rewrote Terence H. Winkless’ original draft adaptation of a marginal pulp horror novel written by Gary Brandner and crafted a brilliant script that expertly combined crime procedurals, horror, and humor. Director Joe Dante drew from his deep …

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A Hard Rain Is Going To Fall On Friday The 13th

Horror movies present intriguing hypothetical avenues for critical analysis. Whether an escapist or gritty film, audiences can look for themes within the subtext driving the story. Unless, of course, we are dealing with entirely disposable entertainment. The horror movie genre often roots itself in pure exploitation, with a distribution company-driven product designed to make fast money. Exploitation roots, however, don’t …

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Storm Winds Upend 3 Horror Film Cautions in Crawl

The horror genre, like virtually all genres, relies on many repetitive narrative constructs. Characters in horror movies tend to make the same errors in judgment time and time again, finding themselves unavoidably in trouble. Mad scientists famously never learn lessons by predecessors when trying to either play God or engage in garishly unethical experiments. Audiences famously never grow tired of …

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Moon Beasts and Moon Mercenaries: Looking Back at Werewolf By Night #32

Both Werewolf by Night and Moon Knight are coming to Marvel’s live-action productions. The debut of Jack Russell, The Werewolf, comes after a lengthy delay. A film version of Werewolf by Night saw an official announcement in 2005, and promotional material even made its way to public buses. The project ended up shelved, though. Now, Marvel Studios wants to expand …

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Dreams, Interpretations, Anxieties, and A Nightmare on Elm Street

Who knows what fears and anxieties exist deep inside the human mind? Memories and coherent thought patterns aren’t always accessible, but the subconscious may bring forth fragments through dreams. While they might seem like short films playing out while we sleep, they don’t always follow a documentary structure. At times, they can prove mysterious or obvious, surreal or straightforward, experimental …

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The Tragically Ignored Human Side of Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson’s Swamp Thing

A common theme among the iconic science-fiction author Phillip K. Dick focused on a simple question, “What does it mean to be human?” In his short stories and extended works such as Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (aka Blade Runner), Dick examined humanity through inhuman characters such as androids and aliens. Other creative talents explored similar questions in scores …

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Nightstalking a Cynical and Bloodless Establishment with Carl Kolchak

The Night Stalker wasn’t your typical vampire movie, and Carl Kolchak wasn’t your typical vampire film hero. From the silent era to the late 1960s, vampire films, generally, took place in the past. During the 1970s, production houses, looking for something to spark life into tired horror movie formulas, moved vampires to modern days. Count Yorga, Vampire (1970) scored a …

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Music, Monsters, and Spies Add Up to an Assignment: Terror

Music, Monsters, and Even Spies Add Up to an Assignment: Terror During the 1960s through the 1980s, many low-budget European horror films boasted outstanding soundtracks. Even some genuinely awful grade-B movies sported brilliant theme music. The wild classic creatures ensemble romp, The Monsters of Terror (1970), might not make much narrative sense, but you can still dance to the trippy …

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Failure to Communicate at Manchester Morgue

Long-time fans of horror films likely can’t shake the shock from seeing “cannibal zombie entertainment” find mainstream acceptance. Decades ago, George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead pulled in well over $5 million during its original 1968 theatrical run, yet few production companies took a change releasing an equally violent copycat. It wasn’t until 1974 that a creepy film …

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