Vintage Screams

Welcome to the world of Vintage Screams! Old School Horror articles for your delight!

Ingmar Bergman

IB Ingmar Bergman photo 1

Horror News is mostly devoted to horror as a definable separate genre, that is, to films that draw upon (and occasionally expand) an existing tradition. Most of the directors and writers who work in this field are very conscious of belonging to a generic tradition. But fantasies and nightmares can be created by anybody, and it sometimes happens that directors from quite different traditions find it appropriate to draw upon the world’s … Continue reading

Leave a comment

The Prisoner (1967 TV series)

Prisoner photo 1

Howard Zimmerman summed it up nicely in Starlog magazine way back in 1978: “The Prisoner is a show steeped in paradox. It is one of the most exciting series ever produced for television, yet at the same time, watching it can be an extraordinarily frustrating experience. Why bother to watch a show when the action is misleading, the conclusions inconclusive? Because it is provocative, stimulating and thought-provoking.” It remains fresh and popular … Continue reading

1 Comment

Vampire Movie Favourites

Vampire Movie Favourites

When I asked Horror News readers and Facebook friends to tell me their favourite vampire films, I received a terrific response. The suggestions poured in, and all kinds of weird, wonderful and outlandish films fronted up for selection. So while I can’t deny the quality or appeal of films like Planet Of The Vampires (1965), Count Yorga Vampire (1970), Vampyres (1974) or Shadow Of The Vampire (2000), I can only count it … Continue reading

8 Comments

Invasions Of The Body Snatchers

Invasion Of The Body Snatchers 1956 poster 3

In 1955 author Jack Finney published a novel entitled The Body Snatchers, first serialised in Collier’s Magazine the year before. It describes the fictional town of Santa Mira, California being invaded by seeds that have drifted to Earth from space. The seeds replace sleeping people with perfect physical duplicates grown from plantlike pods, while their human victims turn to dust. The duplicates live only five years, and they cannot sexually reproduce. Consequently, … Continue reading

Leave a comment

Stephen King’s Favourite Horror Films

SK Evil Dead 1

(as stated in a 1992 interview):

LADY IN A CAGE (1964)
Lady in a Cage is a classic film that few people in the modern generations are aware of. It was one of the few actual films directed by Walter Garuman, who spent the vast majority of his career doing television work. The film was not a major hit, but remains something of an underground spectacle to this day. The story … Continue reading

1 Comment

Serial Killer Movies P-Z

SERIAL KILLERS P-Z 1

The following article is the third and final part of a three-part list of films featuring serial killers. I’ve deliberately avoided movies concerning ‘spree killers’, ‘obsessed fan’ films, and movies that contain supernatural elements. It is not intended to be a complete list nor terribly insightful, but a simple rundown of the best, worst and most interesting serial killer titles to be found, and I thank both Wikipedia and the Internet Movie … Continue reading

6 Comments

Serial Killer Movies F-O

SERIAL KILLERS F-0 1

The following article is the second part of a three-part list of films featuring serial killers. I’ve deliberately avoided movies concerning ‘spree killers’, ‘obsessed fans’, and movies that contain supernatural elements. It is not intended to be a complete list nor terribly insightful, but a simple rundown of the best, worst and most interesting serial killer titles to be found, and I thank both Wikipedia and the Internet Movie Database for assisting … Continue reading

Leave a comment

Video Nasties

video-nasties

‘Video Nasty‘ was a term coined in Britain around 1982 which applied to certain films distributed on video cassette that were criticised by the media and various religious organisations for their violent content. While cinema violence had been regulated by the British Board of Film Censorship for many years, the lack of regulations for video sales (combined with the claim that any film could be viewed by impressionable kiddies) sparked a massive … Continue reading

Leave a comment

George Lucas – A Feature Profile

GL George Lucas art

In 1964 a short skinny kid entered film school at the University of Southern California, and fifteen years later he was a multi-millionaire. He was still skinny and shy back then. His name is George Lucas and, for a time, it looked as if his first feature film, THX 1138 (1971) was going to be his last. It was produced by George’s friend Francis Ford Coppola as part of the output of … Continue reading

Leave a comment

Anthology Television Part 2

AT2 Montage 3

Continuing on with our essay,  we present –  Vintage Screams: Anthology Television Part 2. If you missed the first part you can access Vintage Screams: Anthology Television Part 1 directly here.

DARKROOM aired from 1981 to 1982, each hour-long episode featuring two or more stories of varying length hosted by actor James Coburn. Starring Steve Allen, David Carradine, Lawrence-Hilton Jacobs, June Lockhart and Esther Rolle, in stories of suspense and terror which … Continue reading

2 Comments

Anthology Television Part 1

AT1 Montage 3

An anthology television series is a program that presents a different story with a different set of characters in each episode. These normally have different actors each week but some employed a permanent ensemble of actors who would appear in a different drama each week (like Four Star Playhouse). Others would have different actors and stories set in the same ‘shared world’ (like Welcome To Paradox). Many anthology shows would have a … Continue reading

4 Comments

Key Genre Films 1980s

1980s-montage-2

How things have changed. In the forties, for instance, one would find it difficult to name twenty good genre films of the decade but, since the late seventies, Hollywood has learned that their baby-booming audiences could not only handle strong horror and science fiction concepts, they craved them. Filmmakers everywhere went into overdrive. Like television today, there wasn’t a production house around that didn’t have at least one genre project in the making.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Sam Peckinpah

SP Sam Peckinpah photo 2

Since 1967 a number of American filmmakers have tried their hand at making movies of great violence that have managed to further refine the complexity of the statement contained in the groundbreaking big-budget Hollywood blockbuster Bonnie And Clyde (1967). One filmmaker who earned his ‘Red Badge’ is Sam Peckinpah who, like Arthur Penn and John Frankenheimer, can be seen as part of the American sixties ‘new wave’ – young directors who came … Continue reading

Leave a comment

Twin Peaks (TV series)

Twin Peaks title 1

While it’s feasible that there’s the odd person over thirty years of age out there that didn’t see the Twin Peaks series when it was first televised in 1990, it’s unlikely that they are unaware of the cultural run-off from the groundbreaking show. Catchphrases like “She’s dead – wrapped in plastic” and “Who killed Laura Palmer?” adorned T-shirts, fans held coffee-and-doughnut parties, and large sections of the world went quiet for an … Continue reading

Leave a comment

Key Genre Films 1970s

1970s-Key-Genre-Films-400x329

With The Andromeda Strain (1971) director Robert Wise proved that he was still as adept with science fiction themes as he was with the supernatural. A well constructed thriller, it tells of a group of scientists trying to analyse a strange alien spore which comes to earth. Stanley Kubrick, having explored the sterile depths of space in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), returned to a grungy Earth to show what might be happening in … Continue reading

2 Comments

Key Genre Films 1960s

1960s-Key-Genre-Films

Throughout the sixties, Hammer studios continued with their blood-and-thunder remakes, including The Curse Of The Werewolf (1960), The Two Faces Of Doctor Jekyll (1960), The Brides Of Dracula (1960), The Phantom Of The Opera (1962), Kiss Of The Vampire (1964), The Evil Of Frankenstein (1964) and Dracula Prince Of Darkness (1966). Hammer also delved into other aspects of fantasy over the next few years: Science fiction in Five Million Years To Earth (1967), lesbian … Continue reading

Leave a comment

Key Genre Films 1950s

1950s-Key-Genre-Films

Just as the thirties had been a golden age for Gothic horror films, so the fifties would do the same for science fiction. The power of the atom had undeniably hooked the public on the wonders of science. This, coupled with the development of rocket power and the first major UFO sightings, provided a wealth of exploitable material for the film industry. The first film off the launch pad was to have been Destination … Continue reading

Leave a comment

Key Genre Films 1940s

1940s-Key-Genre-Films

The forties got off to a cracking start with Paramount’s Technicolor production of Doctor Cyclops (1940) starring Albert Dekker as a crazed scientist who discovers the secret of miniaturisation deep in the South American jungles. The film contains superb special effects sequences which required the construction of gigantic sets and props of everyday articles, including books, chairs, pot-plants and scientific instruments. Universal Studios, while reluctant to invest their horror films with big budgets, also … Continue reading

Leave a comment

Key Genre Films 1930s

1930s

In 1924 the first major theatrical production of Bram Stoker’s Dracula opened on stage in England. Starring writer-actor Hamilton Deane, the play was such a success that it was transferred to London’s West End. In 1927 the production opened on Broadway starring a young Hungarian actor named Bela Lugosi. Universal pictures purchased the screen rights that same year for US$40,000, intending to make the first ‘talkie’ version of the film with their … Continue reading

1 Comment

Key Genre Films 1920s

1920s

The coming of sound to the movies meant a great deal to the development of the fantasy genre. Although science fiction and particularly horror films had been produced since the earliest days of the medium, the addition of dialogue and, more importantly, special effects, greatly enhanced the creative abilities of filmmakers. As early as the turn of last century, Frenchman Georges MĂ©liès had making short ‘trick’ films which had often been about … Continue reading

Leave a comment

Luis Buñuel

Luis Buñuel 1

While the commercial form of genre cinema was being shaped, first in Germany in the twenties and then Hollywood in the thirties, it was receiving a rather different kind of input from several non-commercial intellectual filmmakers in Europe. Yet it was not so very long before the influence of the artistic movement of surrealism was making its way into the commercial cinema as well. Surrealism as a separately definable movement grew up … Continue reading

3 Comments