Author Archives: Nigel Honeybone

Film Review: The Phantom From 10,000 Leagues (1955)

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SYNOPSIS: “An unusual radioactive rock on the sea bottom mutates the ocean life into a horrible monster. When charred, radioactive bodies begin to drift ashore a scientist and government agent investigate the phenomenon, and it’s connection to a local marine biology professor.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: As the fifties grew to a close so did the era of the giant radioactive beast. Spawned from the nuclear fears stemming from World War Two, the movies saw dozens … Continue reading

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Film Review: One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)

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SYNOPSIS: “McMurphy, a man with several assault convictions to his name, finds himself in jail once again. This time, the charge is statutory rape when it turns out that his girlfriend had lied about being eighteen, and was, in fact, fifteen. Rather than spend his time in jail, he convinces the guards that he’s crazy enough to need psychiatric care and is sent to a hospital. He fits in frighteningly well, and his different point … Continue reading

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Film Review: The Evil Dead (1981)

The Evil Dead (1981)

SYNOPSIS: “Five friends go to a cabin in the woods for a vacation. They discover The Book of the Dead and a tape recorder belonging to a professor, who also owns the cabin. One of them plays back what is recorded on the tape– which just happens to be Candarian resurrection passages translated from the Necronomicon (Book of the Dead) by the professor, which unleashes an evil force from the woods. The people start turning … Continue reading

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Film Review: Nosferatu (1922)

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SYNOPSIS: “Count Orlok moves to Wisburg bringing the plague, which reveals his connection to the realtor Thomas Hutter, and the Count’s obsession with Hutter’s wife, Ellen – the only one with the power to end the evil.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: Back in the twenties, German director F.W. Murnau was so impressed with Bram Stoker‘s novel Dracula, he made Nosferatu: A Symphony Of Horror (1922), which remains one of the greatest horror films of all time. … Continue reading

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Film Review: Nightmare Castle (1965)

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SYNOPSIS: “A sadistic count tortures and murders his unfaithful wife and her lover, then removes their hearts from their bodies. Years later, the count remarries and the new wife experiences nightmares and hauntings. The ghosts of the slain return to exact their bloody revenge, until their hearts are destroyed.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: This week, for complicity in crimes against good taste, I sentence you, good reader, to ninety minutes trapped in Nightmare Castle (1965)! A … Continue reading

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Film Review: Night Of The Living Dead: Reanimated (2009)

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SYNOPSIS: “Night Of The Living Dead: Reanimated features the work of various artists, animators, and filmmakers from around the globe. The mixed media featured include puppetry, CGI, hand-drawn animation, illustration, acrylics, claymation, and even tattoos, just to name a few. This mass-collaboration approach is less about remaking Romero’s film and more about viewing the classic through an experimental lens. Instead of trying to alter Image Ten’s work, NOTLD:R seeks to showcase the responses that artists … Continue reading

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Film Review: Night Of The Living Dead (1968)

Night Of The Living Dead (1968)

SYNOPSIS: “The dead come back to life and eat the living in this low budget, black and white film. Several people barricade themselves inside a rural house in an attempt to survive the night. Outside are hordes of relentless, shambling zombies who can only be killed by a blow to the head.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: I am privileged, nay, honoured to discuss one of the most influential horror films of all time. I speak of … Continue reading

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Film Review: The Mystery Of The Wax Museum (1933)

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SYNOPSIS: “In London, sculptor Ivan Igor struggles in vain to prevent his partner Worth from burning his wax museum and his ‘children.’ Years later, Igor starts a new museum in New York, but his maimed hands confine him to directing lesser artists. People begin disappearing (including a corpse from the morgue), Igor takes a sinister interest in Charlotte Duncan, fiancĂ©e of his assistant Ralph, but arouses the suspicions of Charlotte’s roommate, wisecracking reporter Florence.” (courtesy … Continue reading

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Film Review: Moon Of The Wolf (1972)

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SYNOPSIS: “After several locals are viciously murdered, a Louisiana sheriff starts to suspect he may be dealing with a werewolf.” (thanks to IMDB for that detailed synopsis) REVIEW: This week I have a film that has never been shown in a cinema anywhere in the world. Never at a drive-in. Never on a double-bill with Plan Nine From Outer Space (1959), not even as a National Lampoon direct-to-DVD movie. You’re excited, I know, you’re thinking … Continue reading

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Film Review: Monsters, Inc. (2001)

Monsters Inc poster 1

SYNOPSIS: “James P. Sullivan and Mike Wazowski pick up their paychecks at Monsters Incorporated, the utility company that generates energy from the goose bumps of children. Sulley, the Number One scream-generator at the plant accidentally lets in a little girl into the monster world. Since monsters are actually terrified of children it’s a major cause for alarm and a major headache for Sulley and Mike.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: Every kid knows there are monsters. Whether … Continue reading

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Film Review: Manos The Hands Of Fate (1966)

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SYNOPSIS: “A family driving through a small town gets lost and winds up at a backwoods shack managed by Torgo, who takes care of it while The Master is away. The Master worships Manos, an evil deity, and he also wears a neat cape. When Torgo lets the family stay, The Master awakens and does mean stuff like burning off Torgo’s hand and sicking his dog on the family pet. Meanwhile, The Master’s wives wrestle … Continue reading

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Film Review: The Mad Monster (1942)

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SYNOPSIS: “Doctor Cameron has succeeded in his experiments with a serum which will turn a man into a wolf-like monster, and is ready to avenge himself on the men who caused his professional failure. He uses it on his gardener Petro and one after the other is killed by his creation. His daughter, Lenora, grows suspicious and confides with newspaper reporter Tom Gregory.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: This week I have a rare film for you, … Continue reading

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Film Review: Logan’s Run (1976)

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SYNOPSIS: “Logan, a Sandman, is forced to search for Sanctuary – a place to which people have apparently escaped from the sealed city of the future in which he lives. Jessica is caught up along the way and becomes his companion fugitive as they are both pursued by Francis, a fellow Sandman. Sanctuary is not what they expect.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: Welcome to the Twenty-Third Century – seventies style! Here, beneath massive domes, a sprawling … Continue reading

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Living Dolls

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My old friend Sigmund Freud claimed that most children fantasise about dolls coming to life, and psychologist Ernst Jentsch theorised that uncanny feelings arise when there is an intellectual uncertainty about whether an object is alive or not, and also when an object that one knows to be inanimate resembles a living being enough to generate confusion about its nature. Robot engineer Masahiro Mori expanded on Freud and Jentsch’s theories to develop the ‘Uncanny Valley’ … Continue reading

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Film Review: The Little Shop Of Horrors (1960)

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SYNOPSIS: “Seymour is a young man who works in a flower store. He manages to create a carnivorous plant that feeds on human flesh. Nobody knows about it, so Seymour and the plant become ‘good friends’. The plant needs food to grow up, so it convinces him to start killing people.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: This week I wish to discuss the second film in my Charles B. Griffith retrospective, and his greatest contribution to the … Continue reading

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Film Review: The Last Woman On Earth (1960)

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SYNOPSIS: “Rich man Harold Gern (Antony Carbone), busy making money and spending it just as fast, is newly married with Evelyn (Betsy Jones-Moreland) and on his honeymoon in Puerto Rico. His lawyer Martin Joyce (Robert Towne) is there too on business to try and get him out of a situation with the government. Harold gambles a lot and one day decide to deal with the lawyer by going fishing and scuba diving. The three go … Continue reading

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About Nigel Honeybone

Wee Willie"Nigel Honeybone's debut was as Hamlet's dead father, portraying him as a tall posh skeleton. This triumph was followed in Richard III, as the remains of a young prince which he interpreted as a tall posh skeleton. He began attracting starring roles. Henry VIII was scaled down to suit Honeybone's very personalised view of this famous king. Honeybone suggested that perhaps he really was quite skeletal, quite tall, and quite posh. MacBeth, Shylock and Othello followed, all played as tall, skeletal and posh, respectively. Considering his reputation for playing tall English skeletons, many believed that the real Honeybone inside to be something very different, like a squat hunchback perhaps. Interestingly enough, Honeybone did once play a squat hunchback, but it was as a tall posh skeleton. But he was propelled into the film world when, in Psycho (1960), he wore women's clothing for the very first time. The seed of an idea was planted and, after working with director Ed Wood for five years, he realised the unlimited possibilities of tall posh skeletons who dressed in women's clothing. He went on to wear women's clothing in thirteen major motion pictures, including the Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) and Star Wars (1977), heartbreaking as the remains of Aunt Beru. With the onslaught of special effects came the demise of real actors in these sorts of roles. After modeling for CGI skeletons in Total Recall (1990) and Toys (1992), the only possible step forward for a tall posh skeleton was television, imparting his knowledge and expertise of the arts. As well as writing for the world's best genre news website HORROR NEWS, Nigel Honeybone is currently signed to star in a new series for television presenting the finest examples of B-grade horror. THE SCHLOCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW is seen on Friday nights at 10.30pm on TVS Television Sydney, and where ever good Youtube downloads are available." (Fantales candy wrapper circa 2007)