Author Archives: Nigel Honeybone

Film Review: The Bat (1959)

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SYNOPSIS: “Mystery writer Cornelia Van Gorder has rented a country house called The Oaks which, not long ago, had been the scene of some murders committed by a strange and violent criminal known as The Bat. Meanwhile, the owner of the house, bank president John Fleming, has recently embezzled one million dollars in securities, and has hidden the proceeds in the house, but he is killed before he can retrieve the money. Thus the lonely … Continue reading

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Film Review: Bad Taste (1987)

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SYNOPSIS: “Derek and his friends must investigate the missing people in a small village. Then they find out its human formed aliens that are really big headed monsters that used all the people in the small village into there snack burgers. Now, Derek must save the day and the world with his chainsaw before the meat eaters strikes the whole planet. Will Derek kill all the aliens?” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: This week I have a … Continue reading

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Film Review: Back To The Future (1985)

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SYNOPSIS: “Marty McFly, a typical American teenager of the Eighties, is accidentally sent back to 1955 in a plutonium-powered DeLorean time machine invented by slightly mad scientist. During his often hysterical, always amazing trip back in time, Marty must make certain his teenage parents-to-be meet and fall in love – so he can get back to the future.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: In September of 1980, filmmakers Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale collaborated on a script … Continue reading

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Film Review: Attack Of The Crab Monsters (1957)

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SYNOPSIS: “A group of scientists travel to a remote island to study the effects of nuclear weapons tests, only to get stranded when their airplane explodes. The team soon discovers that the island has been taken over by crabs that have mutated into enormous, intelligent monsters. To add to their problems, the island is slowly sinking into the ocean. Will any of them manage to escape?” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: This week I discuss for your … Continue reading

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Film Review: American Psycho (2000)

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SYNOPSIS: “Patrick Bateman is handsome, well educated and intelligent. He is twenty-seven and living his own American dream. He works by day on Wall Street, earning a fortune to complement the one he was born with. At night he descends into madness, as he experiments with fear and violence.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: Controversial as it may be, this tale of a Wall Street high-flyer by day, loony killer by night, contains less violence than one … Continue reading

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Film Review: All The Kind Strangers (1974)

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SYNOPSIS: “A couple traveling through a backwoods area are held by a a group of orphans who want them to become their parents. Unfortunately, the kids have a habit of killing adults who refuse that particular honor.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: This week I’m discussing something a little different. No, not a good film, you’ve already had that chance. No, this week’s film is another in that peculiar genre, the made-for-television movie, as opposed to the … Continue reading

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Comedy With Bite

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I’ve recently completed a review for Mel Brooks’ 1995 film Dracula: Dead And Loving It, which takes a few lame swipes at Nosferatu (1922), Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992) and Horror Of Dracula (1958), but seldom veers off into the slew of newer vampire movies, including Interview With The Vampire (1994). The problem with this approach is that sending-up old vampire cliches is no great cinematic innovation. From Abbott And Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948) to Old … Continue reading

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Book Review: Arkham Asylum – Author Grant Morrison

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Since his creation, the Batman has undergone a variety of radical reassessments. From the camp parody version of the sixties, to the dark vigilante of the seventies, to the big-budgeted merchandising exercises of the nineties, finally to arrive in this new century with a film adaptation that seems to please both Batman fans and mainstream audiences alike. But the character was taken to new extremes by innovative Scottish writer Grant Morrison with the 1989 release … Continue reading

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Film Review: Alien (1979)

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SYNOPSIS: “When a mining ship lands on a planet to investigate upon a suspected SOS, the entire crew are unaware of the terror which they would unleash upon their ship. When a alien life-form attaches itself to the face of a crew member, the rest of the team act fast to try and separate the two organisms. Unbeknown to everyone, this is the start of the terror which would effect every member of the seven-person … Continue reading

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Film Review: Alice Sweet Alice (1976)

SYNOPSIS: “Alice Spages is a withdrawn twelve-year-old girl who lives with her mother, Catherine, and her younger sister, Karen. Karen gets most of the attention from her mother, and Alice is often left out of the spotlight. But when Karen is found brutally murdered in a church before her first holy communion, all suspicions are turned towards Alice. But is a twelve-year-old girl really capable of such savagery? As more people begin to die at … Continue reading

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Film Review: Attack Of The Giant Leeches (1957)

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SYNOPSIS: “After local moonshine-swilling trapper Lem Sawyer sees a giant creature, people start disappearing. While searching for illegal traps Steve Benton and Nan Greyson, his girl-friend find Lem dying with giant sucker wounds on his body. One couple Liz Walker and Cal Moulton, forced into the water by her enraged husband Dave Walker, gets taken by the leeches. When police refuse to believe Dave’s story, he hangs himself. Soon after this, two more trappers disappear, … Continue reading

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About Nigel Honeybone

Wee Willie"Nigel Honeybone's debut was as Hamlet's dead father, portraying him as a tall posh skeleton. This triumph was followed in Richard III, as the remains of a young prince which he interpreted as a tall posh skeleton. He began attracting starring roles. Henry VIII was scaled down to suit Honeybone's very personalised view of this famous king. Honeybone suggested that perhaps he really was quite skeletal, quite tall, and quite posh. MacBeth, Shylock and Othello followed, all played as tall, skeletal and posh, respectively. Considering his reputation for playing tall English skeletons, many believed that the real Honeybone inside to be something very different, like a squat hunchback perhaps. Interestingly enough, Honeybone did once play a squat hunchback, but it was as a tall posh skeleton. But he was propelled into the film world when, in Psycho (1960), he wore women's clothing for the very first time. The seed of an idea was planted and, after working with director Ed Wood for five years, he realised the unlimited possibilities of tall posh skeletons who dressed in women's clothing. He went on to wear women's clothing in thirteen major motion pictures, including the Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) and Star Wars (1977), heartbreaking as the remains of Aunt Beru. With the onslaught of special effects came the demise of real actors in these sorts of roles. After modeling for CGI skeletons in Total Recall (1990) and Toys (1992), the only possible step forward for a tall posh skeleton was television, imparting his knowledge and expertise of the arts. As well as writing for the world's best genre news website HORROR NEWS, Nigel Honeybone is currently signed to star in a new series for television presenting the finest examples of B-grade horror. THE SCHLOCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW is seen on Friday nights at 10.30pm on TVS Television Sydney, and where ever good Youtube downloads are available." (Fantales candy wrapper circa 2007)