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Nigel Honeybone

"Rondo Award Winner Nigel Honeybone's debut was as Hamlet's dead father, portraying him as a tall posh skeleton. This triumph was followed in Richard III, as the remains of a young prince which he interpreted as a tall posh skeleton. He began attracting starring roles. Henry VIII was scaled down to suit Honeybone's very personalised view of this famous king. Honeybone suggested that perhaps he really was quite skeletal, quite tall, and quite posh. MacBeth, Shylock and Othello followed, all played as tall, skeletal and posh, respectively. Considering his reputation for playing tall English skeletons, many believed that the real Honeybone inside to be something very different, like a squat hunchback perhaps. Interestingly enough, Honeybone did once play a squat hunchback, but it was as a tall posh skeleton. But he was propelled into the film world when, in Psycho (1960), he wore women's clothing for the very first time. The seed of an idea was planted and, after working with director Ed Wood for five years, he realised the unlimited possibilities of tall posh skeletons who dressed in women's clothing. He went on to wear women's clothing in thirteen major motion pictures, including the Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) and Star Wars (1977), heartbreaking as the remains of Aunt Beru. With the onslaught of special effects came the demise of real actors in these sorts of roles. After modeling for CGI skeletons in Total Recall (1990) and Toys (1992), the only possible step forward for a tall posh skeleton was television, imparting his knowledge and expertise of the arts. As well as writing for the world's best genre news website HORROR NEWS, Nigel Honeybone also presents the finest examples of B-grade horror on THE SCHLOCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW seen every Friday night on TVS Television Sydney." (Fantales candy wrapper)

Philippe Mora

Philippe Mora 1

Depending on my critical faculties or level of intoxication, director Philippe Mora is either the unjustly neglected surrealist auteur of Australian cinema, or the nation’s very own Ed Wood Junior. Consider the wild array of evidence presented on a recently-released DVD simply titled Philippe Mora Triple (the distributors decided not to use the word Threat at the end). Where else ...

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Film Review: The Phantom From 10,000 Leagues (1955)

Phantom From 10,000 Leagues poster 1

SYNOPSIS: “An unusual radioactive rock on the sea bottom mutates the ocean life into a horrible monster. When charred, radioactive bodies begin to drift ashore a scientist and government agent investigate the phenomenon, and it’s connection to a local marine biology professor.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: As the fifties grew to a close so did the era of the giant radioactive ...

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Film Review: One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest poster 1

SYNOPSIS: “McMurphy, a man with several assault convictions to his name, finds himself in jail once again. This time, the charge is statutory rape when it turns out that his girlfriend had lied about being eighteen, and was, in fact, fifteen. Rather than spend his time in jail, he convinces the guards that he’s crazy enough to need psychiatric care ...

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Film Review: Nosferatu (1922)

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SYNOPSIS: “Count Orlok moves to Wisburg bringing the plague, which reveals his connection to the realtor Thomas Hutter, and the Count’s obsession with Hutter’s wife, Ellen – the only one with the power to end the evil.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: Back in the twenties, German director F.W. Murnau was so impressed with Bram Stoker‘s novel Dracula, he made Nosferatu: A ...

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Film Review: Night Of The Living Dead: Reanimated (2009)

Night Of The Living Dead Reanimated poster 1

SYNOPSIS: “Night Of The Living Dead: Reanimated features the work of various artists, animators, and filmmakers from around the globe. The mixed media featured include puppetry, CGI, hand-drawn animation, illustration, acrylics, claymation, and even tattoos, just to name a few. This mass-collaboration approach is less about remaking Romero’s film and more about viewing the classic through an experimental lens. Instead ...

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Film Review: The Mystery Of The Wax Museum (1933)

Mystery Of The Wax Museum poster 1

SYNOPSIS: “In London, sculptor Ivan Igor struggles in vain to prevent his partner Worth from burning his wax museum and his ‘children.’ Years later, Igor starts a new museum in New York, but his maimed hands confine him to directing lesser artists. People begin disappearing (including a corpse from the morgue), Igor takes a sinister interest in Charlotte Duncan, fiancée ...

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Film Review: Monsters, Inc. (2001)

Monsters Inc poster 1

SYNOPSIS: “James P. Sullivan and Mike Wazowski pick up their paychecks at Monsters Incorporated, the utility company that generates energy from the goose bumps of children. Sulley, the Number One scream-generator at the plant accidentally lets in a little girl into the monster world. Since monsters are actually terrified of children it’s a major cause for alarm and a major ...

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Larry Cohen

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There is plenty of room for argument about director Larry Cohen. His films, when mentioned at all, tend to be dismissed as the lowest kind of hack work. It’s Alive (1973), one of the most successful films of its year at the box-office, appears in a book called The Best, Worst And Most Unusual Horror Films by Darrell W. Moore. ...

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