Author Archives: Nigel Honeybone

Twin Peaks (TV series)

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While it’s feasible that there’s the odd person over thirty years of age out there that didn’t see the Twin Peaks series when it was first televised in 1990, it’s unlikely that they are unaware of the cultural run-off from the groundbreaking show. Catchphrases like “She’s dead – wrapped in plastic” and “Who killed Laura Palmer?” adorned T-shirts, fans held coffee-and-doughnut parties, and large sections of the world went quiet for an hour every week. … Continue reading

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Film Review: Wild At Heart (1990)

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SYNOPSIS: “Lula’s psychopathic mother goes crazy at the thought of Lula being with Sailor, who just got free from jail. Ignoring Sailor’s probation, they set out for California. However their mother hires a killer to hunt down Sailor. Unaware of this, the two enjoy their journey and themselves being together, until they witness a young woman dying after a car accident – a bad omen.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: David Lynch‘s cunningly disguised unofficial remake of … Continue reading

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Film Review: Duel (1971)

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SYNOPSIS: “David Mann is feeling emasculated in his life, especially after a fight with his wife the evening before. While driving to a business appointment along a two-lane relatively secluded highway in the California desert, David, innocently he believes, passes an eighteen-wheel fuel truck. Later, the truck comes across him again, playing games of road chicken. David initially thinks that the truck driver is just a bad driver. Then, he believes the truck driver is … Continue reading

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Film Review: Targets (1968)

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SYNOPSIS: “Peter Bogdanovich’s debut feature is a thinly disguised account of ex-marine Charles Whitman, who, after murdering his mother and his wife, armed himself with a number of rifles and handguns and on a sunny 1966 Texas morning, began a shooting spree that killed fourteen people and wounded thirty-two people. Bogdanovich’s version tells two stories concurrently, about an aging horror-film star who feels that his type of movie monster has become passé, and the other … Continue reading

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Film Review: Salem’s Lot (1979)

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SYNOPSIS: “Salem’s Lot is a town which a new member, Mr. Straker, has taken as his new ‘home’, and has a mysterious partner, namely Mr. Barlow. Not too long after Straker arrives in Salem’s Lot, people start disappearing from sight and dying from odd causes, and no one is sure why, including Ben Mears who is in town to write a new book on the town’s rumored haunted house called the Marsten House, which overlooks … Continue reading

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Film Review: Burnt Offerings (1976)

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SYNOPSIS: “Haunted house chiller from Dan Curtis has Oliver Reed and Karen Black as summer caretakers moving into Gothic house with their young son. The catch? The house rejuvenates a part of itself with each death that occurs on its premises.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: One of the oldest possession themes of all is the house or building possessed of evil, from The Turn Of The Screw by Henry James (1898) to The Haunting Of Hill … Continue reading

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Film Review: Dominique Is Dead (1980)

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SYNOPSIS: “The wife of a greedy man comes back to haunt him after he scares her to death in this horror-thriller. He is after her money and must try several times before he finally succeeds. Because she is mentally exhausted from being frightened all the time, she commits suicide, but soon the husband begins experiencing her ghostly presence.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: I have a confession to make. I have for your bemusement this week another … Continue reading

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Key Genre Films 1970s

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With The Andromeda Strain (1971) director Robert Wise proved that he was still as adept with science fiction themes as he was with the supernatural. A well constructed thriller, it tells of a group of scientists trying to analyse a strange alien spore which comes to earth. Stanley Kubrick, having explored the sterile depths of space in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), returned to a grungy Earth to show what might be happening in the … Continue reading

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Key Genre Films 1960s

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Throughout the sixties, Hammer studios continued with their blood-and-thunder remakes, including The Curse Of The Werewolf (1960), The Two Faces Of Doctor Jekyll (1960), The Brides Of Dracula (1960), The Phantom Of The Opera (1962), Kiss Of The Vampire (1964), The Evil Of Frankenstein (1964) and Dracula Prince Of Darkness (1966). Hammer also delved into other aspects of fantasy over the next few years: Science fiction in Five Million Years To Earth (1967), lesbian vampires … Continue reading

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Key Genre Films 1950s

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Just as the thirties had been a golden age for Gothic horror films, so the fifties would do the same for science fiction. The power of the atom had undeniably hooked the public on the wonders of science. This, coupled with the development of rocket power and the first major UFO sightings, provided a wealth of exploitable material for the film industry. The first film off the launch pad was to have been Destination Moon … Continue reading

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Key Genre Films 1940s

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The forties got off to a cracking start with Paramount’s Technicolor production of Doctor Cyclops (1940) starring Albert Dekker as a crazed scientist who discovers the secret of miniaturisation deep in the South American jungles. The film contains superb special effects sequences which required the construction of gigantic sets and props of everyday articles, including books, chairs, pot-plants and scientific instruments. Universal Studios, while reluctant to invest their horror films with big budgets, also turned … Continue reading

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Film Review: Creepshow (1982)

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SYNOPSIS: “Five tales of terror are presented. The first deals with a demented old man returning from the grave to get the Father’s Day cake his murdering daughter never gave him. The second is about a not-too-bright farmer discovering a meteor that turns everything into plant-life. The third is about a vengeful husband burying his wife and her lover up to their necks on the beach. The fourth is about a creature that resides in … Continue reading

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Film Review: Zontar The Thing From Venus (1966)

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SYNOPSIS: “A misguided scientist enables an alien from Venus named Zontar to come to earth in order to help solve man’s problems. However, Zontar has other ideas, like disabling the power supply of the entire world and taking possession of important officials with mind control devices.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: This week I wish to discuss a well-intentioned scientist who brings an alien from Venus to Earth to help solve man’s problems, but the evil alien … Continue reading

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Film Review: Silent Night Bloody Night (1972)

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SYNOPSIS: “Wilford Butler returns home on Christmas Eve and his house had been turned into a mental institution for the criminally insane. But the day of his return, he is set on fire and dies. The townspeople believe his death was an accident, and the institution-house is later closed down. Wilford leaves the house to his grandson Jeffrey. A few years later, Jeffrey finally decides to sell his grandfather’s house, but the townspeople including the … Continue reading

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Film Review: Phantom From Space (1953)

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SYNOPSIS: “An alien being with the power of invisibility lands in Santa Monica. Killing two people who attacked him due to the menacing appearance of his spacesuit, the creature takes it off while being pursued by government authorities.” (courtesy IMDB) REVIEW: Some of my more seasoned readers should remember director Billy Wilder as a filmmaker whose incredible career spanned more than sixty films over half a century. Regarded as one of the most brilliant and … Continue reading

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Film Review: The Brother From Another Planet (1984)

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SYNOPSIS: “A slave from outer space escapes to earth. Except for his three-toed feet, he looks like an ordinary young black man. He crash-lands on Ellis Island, appropriately enough, and ends up in Harlem. There he makes friends with the owner and the regulars of a bar. Because he can fix any machine (by simply touching it), he’s able to make money. He’s mute, which proves more of an advantage than a disadvantage, and he … Continue reading

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About Nigel Honeybone

Wee Willie"Nigel Honeybone's debut was as Hamlet's dead father, portraying him as a tall posh skeleton. This triumph was followed in Richard III, as the remains of a young prince which he interpreted as a tall posh skeleton. He began attracting starring roles. Henry VIII was scaled down to suit Honeybone's very personalised view of this famous king. Honeybone suggested that perhaps he really was quite skeletal, quite tall, and quite posh. MacBeth, Shylock and Othello followed, all played as tall, skeletal and posh, respectively. Considering his reputation for playing tall English skeletons, many believed that the real Honeybone inside to be something very different, like a squat hunchback perhaps. Interestingly enough, Honeybone did once play a squat hunchback, but it was as a tall posh skeleton. But he was propelled into the film world when, in Psycho (1960), he wore women's clothing for the very first time. The seed of an idea was planted and, after working with director Ed Wood for five years, he realised the unlimited possibilities of tall posh skeletons who dressed in women's clothing. He went on to wear women's clothing in thirteen major motion pictures, including the Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) and Star Wars (1977), heartbreaking as the remains of Aunt Beru. With the onslaught of special effects came the demise of real actors in these sorts of roles. After modeling for CGI skeletons in Total Recall (1990) and Toys (1992), the only possible step forward for a tall posh skeleton was television, imparting his knowledge and expertise of the arts. As well as writing for the world's best genre news website HORROR NEWS, Nigel Honeybone is currently signed to star in a new series for television presenting the finest examples of B-grade horror. THE SCHLOCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW is seen on Friday nights at 10.30pm on TVS Television Sydney, and where ever good Youtube downloads are available." (Fantales candy wrapper circa 2007)