Book Review: Ouroboros – Author Michael Kelly & Carol Weekes

Ouroboros by Michael Kelly and Carol Weekes

In a small coastal town, an ancient force stirs, drawn by the cumulative power of life and death, grief and sorrow, and ultimately, endless love.

OUROBOROS – life out of death.

Tom Christiansen’s wife of 35-years, Dolly, is dead. His world suddenly shattered, Tom takes refuge in his house to grieve and reflect. Tom’s thin veil of reality and fantasy begins to crack and slip. He hears things: the rusty creak of the backyard swing; the tap to tiny feet from an upstairs room. And he sees things, as well: a small rubber ball bouncing slowly down the stairs; birds like silent sentinels on electrical wires; a strange little pigtailed girl suddenly appearing in his yard, and what is that mysterious figure lying in the upstairs bed that he used to share with his beloved wife?

OUROBOROS – a new cycle has begun.
Tom’s long-time neighbors, and dearest friends, Mick and Robbi Hamlin begin to notice strange behavior from grief-stricken Tom. The witness dinner place-settings for two. They hear hushed conversations from the old house, as if Tom is speaking to himself, as if he is not alone. There is a pale little girl in the backyard, swinging ceaselessly. And something is rustling in the bushes, peering out from the undergrowth with inquisitive eyes.

OUROBOROS – the end is just the beginning.

I have been reading books for a long time, most of my life actually (but I won’t divulge how long that is). I can count on one hand the books that have scared the daylights out of me. The first being “The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty”, followed by “The Shining by Stephen King”, “Ghost Story by Peter Straub” and “Black Cathedral by Maynard & Sims”. These tales stick with me most because of the unrelenting terror and fear they caused; nightmares, jumping at sounds, sleepless nights, everything a good scary story should do.

Ouroboros by Michael Kelly and Carol Weekes just got added to that list. This is no ordinary book my friends; deep down this is a love story, a character driven tale of a man lost after the death of his soul mate and the crushing loneliness and loss that follows.

The first few chapters are the most heart wrenching I have ever read. If you don’t shed a tear after reading the start of this book, you are quite possible already dead.

From crushing anguish to monstrous fright, Kelly and Weekes weave a tale of madness and reality, friendship and love, and last but not least…terror. The characters that populate Ouroboros are as real as it gets. You will genuinely feel the myriad emotions that they feel…and you will be scared!

Once Ouroboros grabs hold it will not let go. This is the most frightening book I’ve read this year. Long after you finish this book it will stay with you. It will make you to think about your own mortality and those around you, and what exactly happens after we leave this mortal plane.

If you are easily scared and prone to nightmares you might just want to skip this book. But if you revel in being terrified, wondering what that sound is out in your yard at night or that small creaking sound above your head coming from the attic, and enjoy turning the lights out knowing your can’t possibly fall asleep, then this book is for you.

This is an absolute must read period, no matter what genre you favor. A book this real and frightening does not come along very often. Buy it and savor it you will not be disappointed.

I want to thank our friends over at Dark Regions Press for sending over another fantastic read. Pay them a visit and see what they have to offer, one of the best horror publishers around.

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